Welcome to Contemporary Researching!


Joyce Valenza and Doug Johnson captured the essence of our changing research methods in "See Sally Research: Evolving Notions of Information Literacy." You can find the document on Spartan Guides: Research Tools. Scroll about 1/3 the way down the page and you will see it on the right side. Below is the TED Talk Joyce Valenza presented based on this concept. (Thank you, Dr. Gerry Solomon, for sharing this with me!)





Old Style
New Style
Planning
1. Notebook paper and pencil
1. Comprehensive Planning/Research Process Overview

  • Infohio.org Site provides guidance from planning through presentation. Several links in this section are from this site.
  • Research Steps Includes brief overview of research steps. Some of the sections have videos. Students who have trouble taking notes may benefit from the ReadWriteThink.org video.
  • Savvy7 This site provides a research model divided into seven categories. Each category includes both student reflection and a performance rubric.

2. Project Planners

3. Focusing Tools
  • ALTEC's ThinkTank Students have a topic - but do they know how to focus it?
  • Mindmeister A mindmapping tool
  • bubbl.us Another mindmapping tool.
  • Instagrok An interactive tool that can be used not only for planning, but also for notetaking. (Thanks to the session participant at NCSLMA 2012 who introduced this tool to me!)
  • Analyze Your Topic Downloadable form from UC Berkeley. Great starting point.

Research Guides by Subjects
Locating and
Accessing Information
1. Card catalog
2. Reader's Guide to Periodical Index
3. School librarian recommendations
1. Constructing Searches

2. Online catalog
3. SC DISCUS South Carolina's virtual library, provided by the SC State Library.
4. Pathfinders created by your school librarian
5. Using Search Engines
6. Choosing the Best Search Engine for Your Purpose
7. Evaluation Wizard Enter the url of a webpage you wish to evaluate, answer the questions, print your responses.
Note taking
1. 4x6 index cards with one note per card. Cards were numbered according to source and students listed a subtopic at the top of each.
1.Library Learning Commons Making Quality Notes This handout provides a note taking checklist (Notes should be relevant, focused, concise, organized, accurate, honest.) and reviews the types of notes (summarizing, paraphrasing, quoting, and more).

2. Zotero" is a free, easy-to-use tool to help you collect, organize, cite, and share your research sources." (Zotero site)

3. Citelighter is another free service billed as "the fully automated bibliography, research, citation, and Internet highlighting tool." (Citelighter site) Download and install the browser add-on and then you are ready to tackle capturing the notes from online articles and sites that you wish to include in your project. Citelighter automatically creates an editable citation (and you can switch between citation styles with just a click) and when you have finished taking notes, you can export all notes and bibliographic citations to Word.

4. Landmarks' Digital Index Card Complete the sections of form you wish, including your email address, and you will receive an email entitled "Research Tidbit" that includes what you recorded. (Sections of the form: Name, email, project name, project goal, citation information, notes (can be copied and pasted or student paraphrasing or summarizing).

5. Organizing Research with Note Cards from Study Guides and Strategies. Illustrates creating note cards and allows students to create note cards. Cards cannot be saved but must be printed.

6. Library Learning Commons Note Taking Templates This site provides a variety of templates for reference books, books, journals, and websites.

7. Diigo Social bookmarking. After creating a Diigo account, students can save web pages, along with notes, to their accounts.

8. Evernote Accessible from the Internet; download a desktop version onto your computer; install a mobile app on your smartphone or iPad.

9. Dropbox (Use in conjunction with a word processing or spreadsheet program)
10. Google Docs In the January - February 2013 issue of Library Media Connection, Daniel Russo describes how he teaches students to create electronic note cards with a Google Docs Spreadsheet. He has the students create four columns: Slug (or headline), Citation, Notation, and My Ideas. By sorting the spreadsheet using the Slug column, students can group similar notes in order to begin synthesizing information for their final product.
Citing Sources
1. 3x5 index cards with one source per card. Each source was
identified by a number so that note cards' sources could easily
be identified.
1. Online Citation Practice
2. Citation Generators
  • Bibme.org Not only does this site generate citations for you, it creates a Works Cited page.
  • EasyBib
Pulling It All Together
1. Grouping notecards by subtopics
1. Essay Map

2. Google Docs In the January - February 2013 issue of Library Media Connection, Daniel Russo describes how he teaches students to create electronic note cards with a Google Docs Spreadsheet. He has the students create four columns: Slug (or headline), Citation, Notation, and My Ideas. By sorting the spreadsheet using the Slug column, students can group similar notes in order to begin synthesizing information for their final product. (Repeating this from the Notetaking section above.)

3. Holt Interactive Graphic Organizers Students can complete the pdfs online, then print to use as they write their paper or create their project. The site offers a variety of organizers, grouped by category (cause and effect, order and sequence, persuasive and supporting an opinion, etc.).

4. CLRS Research Guide: Outline Maker Once students have organized their notes, they can create a research project outline using this online tool. Students can print or save their outline. If they save it, they can use a word processing program to continue working on it. Please ensure that BEFORE they save their completed outline that they watch the video detailing the process. If they don't follow the steps listed, they could lose their work. (Thank you, Dr. Gerry Solomon, for sharing your Research Process LiveBinder where I discovered this great tool!)
Finished Product
1.Typed research paper
2. Poster
3. Brochure
4. Presentation
1. Google Docs
2. Glogster
3. Presentation tools
Self Evaluation
When research paper/project is returned, wonder why you earned the grade written in red.
1.Research CheckBric Students can download and complete this form to assist them in assessing their project.
Grading
Red ink pen
1. Video grading This YouTube video explains how one instructor uses Google Docs and Jing to grade student papers. Because she uses a screen capture program (Jing), she is able to mark the student paper and provide verbal feedback that the student can then later access.

2. Google Forms Andrew Cullison explains how he uses a Google Form to create a rubric, have the rubric and the student paper open side-by-side on his monitor, and grade the student's paper before emailing the graded paper back to the student.

3. Using Diigo and Jing to Grade In this post Rebecca Johnson shares how she has students use Diigo to not only bookmark their sources, but also to provide the APA citation for the source. She also shares how she uses Jing to mark their work and give them feedback.